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that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
's something that would have to be part of an agreement and acceptable to republicans in this environment, it is something we can defend on a technical basis. it's more accurate and because for middle class people, you know, it's a burden that is relatively small. the most vulnerable even $10 a month for the most vulnerable is a big deal. if you live to be 90 years old and all you have is the social security, that $10 can be the difference between food in the last couple of days of the month. so i think we have to distinguish between what impact going a more correct measure would have. and we have, you know, put in a way that we think is fair. by saying that the most vulnerable have the benefit go up. not because we have the overall adjustment being faster. we will make the decision to go in and make sure they're not hurt. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for appearing. i have four sets of questions i'm going run through quickly. supplementally. first thing has to do with the crap i look at the budget. how it's crurkted. because the choice of the underpinnings of the a
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8